Global Justice Center Blog

GJC’s Statement on Iraq Requesting International Assistance in Bringing Daesh to Justice

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - August 16, 2017

[NEW YORK, NY] -  GJC welcomes Iraq’s letter to the UN requesting assistance in bringing Daesh to justice and thanks the United Kingdom for its efforts in negotiating a UN Security Council resolution. We reiterate our call that all investigations and prosecutions must ensure accountability for gender-based crimes, including those amounting to genocide, by all actors. We also express concern over reports of current Daesh prosecutions that focus solely on terrorism crimes, extrajudicial killings and torture of those thought to be Daesh-aligned and accordingly, call on the Iraqi Government to ensure due process in line with international human rights standards.

We also urge the Iraqi government to ensure that enabling legislation is adopted to incorporate genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity into domestic law in order to ensure that prosecutions reflect the full criminality of the acts in question. The global community must hold the perpetrators of these horrific crimes accountable for their actions, and ensure victims and survivors receive their entitled reparations, including redress and reparations for sexual and gender-based violence. Finally, we call on all parties in Iraq and the Global Coalition against Daesh to ensure respect for international humanitarian law (IHL), including by ensuring access to comprehensive medical and psychosocial care for victims, and to take concrete steps to rescue all remaining Yazidi women and children held captive by Daesh.

For more information contact:

Stephanie Olszewski (New York), Global Justice Center, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. +1.212.725.6530 ext. 211
 

GJC Weekly News Roundup

 

Sunday, Burma rejected claims allegations of ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity against Rohingya Muslims. Last year, in response to Rohingya militants killing nine border guards, the Burmese army allegedly burned down homes, raped village women and shot people on sight in an attack that caused approximately 75,000 to flee to Bangladesh. This prompted a United Nations probe, which is being blocked by Burma.

Monday, a United Nations aid chief warned that there are the early warning signs of genocide in the Central African Republic (CAR). CAR has hosted a war between Muslim and Christian armed groups since 2013, and over half a million people have been displaced. The violence has intensified recently after a period of relative calm, and the UN warns that the risk of ethnic cleansing is heightened.

Monday, New York has formed a New York State Council on Women and Girls. The Council aims to combat discrimination against women and girls by creating state laws on issues like protecting reproductive rights and pushing for equal pay. It was formed in response to the election of President Donald Trump, who is threatening to remove the White House Council on Women and Girls.

Monday, frustrated with the United Nations’ lack of action on holding war criminals accountable, a top former war crimes prosecutor quit the UN’s Independent Commission of Inquiry on Syria. “I give up. The states in the Security Council don’t want justice,” Carla Del Ponte said. This leaves two members of the Commission. Wednesday, the New York Times published an editorial about her resignation and the Commission’s inaction.