Global Justice Center Blog

GJC Weekly News Roundup

File:Stop Separating Immigrant Families Press Conference and Rally Chicago Illinois 6-5-18.jpg

Family Separation Crisis

Last week, the Trump administration made the decision to separate immigrant families at the border by detaining children from their parents. More than 2,300 children were taken from their parents at the border between May 5 and June 9, with leaked videos showing that some were being held in cages. Additionally, some of these children were forcibly drugged by authorities with psychotropic drugs in order to manage their trauma, turning into a lawsuit. Many have condemned these separations, viewing them as politically and morally-wrong, and the White House has been struggling to quiet public outcry. All four living former first ladies have described these separations as cruel, inhumane, and un-American.

Trump’s New Stance on Illegal Immigrants

On Sunday, Trump reversed his policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the border. After this reversal, he stated that people who enter the United States illegally should be deported without acknowledgement of their due-process rights or trial. Trump did not differentiate between those entering to seek asylum and illegal immigrants. Lawmakers now struggle to reach consensus on immigration legislation and federal agencies are trying to reunite the migrant children with their parents. These children are now spread out throughout the country, both in foster homes and institutional settings.

Continue Reading

Rebuilding Iraq Should Include Mental Health Care for Yazidi Survivors

By Maftuna Saidova

The Yazidi community are an ethnic minority formerly located in northern Iraq. They are one of the groups who suffered under the brutal and inhumane control of ISIS. When ISIS captured Sinjar, they abducted thousands of Yazidi women and sold them into slavery within the lucrative sex trade created among ISIS fighters. Human rights activists and lawyers have demanded ISIS be held accountable for employing Sexual Gender Based Violence (SGBV) as a weapon of war. According to OHCHR, SGVB can include “any harmful act directed against individuals or groups of individuals on the basis of their gender,” including rape, sexual abuse, forced pregnancy, forced sterilization, forced abortion, forced prostitution, and sexual enslavement.  Although many Yazidi survivors are now free and Iraq has regained territorial control, adequate mental health treatment should be the priority of the Iraqi government as the treatment of the survivors is crucial for Iraq’s gradual rebuilding process.

Continue Reading

Justice for Queer Iraqis is Not Optional

By Merrite Johnson

Daesh’s crimes against queer Iraqis (or people perceived of being queer, or not sufficiently adhering to traditional gender norms) have been well-documented, including harassment campaigns, arbitrary executions, and forced disappearances. These crimes were also a tactic for building popular support for Daesh’s rule.

Since the UN voted last year to create an international team to investigate crimes Daesh committed in Iraq, human rights advocates including the Global Justice Center have called repeatedly for the team to follow international laws and standards as they investigate all crimes, not just those of terrorism. Earlier this year, GJC published its analysis of Iraq’s national laws, which are woefully insufficient for achieving justice for victims of genocide, crimes against humanity, and gender-based violence. If Daesh crimes are going to be prosecuted in domestic Iraqi courts, there is a very real danger that these venues will shut out LGBTQ Iraqis from seeking justice.

But Daesh isn’t the only group responsible for violence against LGBTQ Iraqis. A report published earlier this year by IraQueer found that 96% of LGBTQ respondents in Iraq have faced some form of violence over the past three years, and there have been documented killing campaigns against queer people in Iraq every year since 2003—well before the arrival of Daesh. The Iraqi government has completely failed to protect its queer citizens from harassment and violence; even worse, state forces have been active participants in targeted anti-LGBTQ violence alongside conservative militias. 

If the international community really is committed to justice, it must ensure not only that queer voices are included in Daesh prosecutions, but also that the Iraqi government is held to its obligations under human rights treaties like the Convention Against Torture and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Now is the time to take action to prove that justice for queer people is not optional.

Statement on the US Decision to Withdraw from the UN Human Rights Council

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - June 19, 2018

[New York] – Today’s decision to withdraw from the UN  Human  Rights  Council  is shortsighted and will further marginalize the United States in the international arena.

The Council is an important venue to address the human rights records of all countries, including the United States. Just yesterday, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights called the Trump Administration’s family separation policy “unconscionable” and demanded its immediate cessation. The UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights is scheduled to present a report to the Council this Thursday that criticizes US policies as “cruel and inhuman,” and driven by a “contempt for the poor.” 

As the Trump Administration continues its abhorrent racist, xenophobic and misogynist policies, withdrawal from the Human Rights Council will not shield the United States from being held accountable under the human rights framework.