GJC Weekly News Roundup

Trump Ignores Advisers during Trump-Putin Summit

President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin’s summit consisted of a 46 minute news conference where Trump attacked his own FBI on foreign soil and heavily praised Russia. Before the meeting, Trump’s staffers provided him with 100 pages of briefing materials that involved a tough stance towards Putin, but the president ignored most of it. Trump’s remarks were, “very much counter to the plan”, said someone familiar with the discussions. Advisers covered matters from Russia’s annexation of Crimea, to its interference in the U.S. elections. However, it has been reported that the president has been reluctant to accept the idea that Russia meddled in the elections.

Immigrant Children Return from Shelters and Recount Experiences

Federal officials have begun to return the 2,500 immigrant children separated from their parents under the Trump Administration’s former family separation policy. Mothers and fathers are being reunited with their children after weeks and months. Many of these children are now deeply traumatized, showing up with cuts and bruises on their face and refusing to speak of their experience. Most suffer from nightmares and now have difficulty trusting their parents. Some explain that they felt like prisoners, as punishment was a constant threat.  Mark Weber, a spokesman for the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the agency responsible for the shelters, said they couldn’t comment on specific children or cases. However, he stated, ““our focus is always on the safety and best interest of each child.”

GJC Weekly News Roundup

NATO in Crisis? President Trump Openly Criticizes Allies

The annual NATO summit took place on Wednesday July 11th. President Trump took no time to openly throw NATO allies, including Germany and Britain, under the bus in the media. "Germany is a captive of Russia," said Trump on Wednesday. Such accusations have only escalated the tension among the United States’ European allies, provoking anxiety among some US officials. “NATO is indispensable,” said Paul Ryan upon hearing Trump’s hasty remarks.

Supreme Court Nomination: The New Era of Conservatism? 

With the sudden announcement of Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement, President Trump was given the opportunity to nominate a candidate to fill Justice Kennedy’s position. On July 9, President Trump chose Brett Kavanaugh, a conservative judge who Democrats, LGBTQ and, abortion rights supporters fear will become the deciding factor in the Supreme Court if confirmed.

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Lopez Obrador Becomes First Leftist to Govern Mexico in Years

Andrés Manuel López Obrador has won Mexico’s presidential election after the concession of his top two rivals. This victory makes him the first leftist president since Mexico transitioned to a multiparty democracy 30 years ago. The former mayor of Mexico City has made promises to the poor and declared a battle against corruption. Obrador said his government would, “represent all citizens rich and poor, religious or nonbelievers, migrants, human beings of all manner of thought and all sexual preferences.”

Trump Weighs Top Picks for Supreme Court

President Trump said he is close to deciding his Supreme Court nominee after evaluating the four leading candidates at his New Jersey golf club. The President must take into account the likely response of key senators and his core supporters to each prospect. Trump has remained quiet about his decision, which he is expected to announce on July 9th at 9 pm, but it will likely be one of the following federal judges: Raymond Kethledge, Amy Coney Barrett, Brett M. Kavanaugh, and Thomas Hardiman. This decision could move abortion opponents one step closer to overturning the landmark case of Roe v. Wade.

GJC Weekly News Roundup

File:Stop Separating Immigrant Families Press Conference and Rally Chicago Illinois 6-5-18.jpg

Family Separation Crisis

Last week, the Trump administration made the decision to separate immigrant families at the border by detaining children from their parents. More than 2,300 children were taken from their parents at the border between May 5 and June 9, with leaked videos showing that some were being held in cages. Additionally, some of these children were forcibly drugged by authorities with psychotropic drugs in order to manage their trauma, turning into a lawsuit. Many have condemned these separations, viewing them as politically and morally-wrong, and the White House has been struggling to quiet public outcry. All four living former first ladies have described these separations as cruel, inhumane, and un-American.

Trump’s New Stance on Illegal Immigrants

On Sunday, Trump reversed his policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the border. After this reversal, he stated that people who enter the United States illegally should be deported without acknowledgement of their due-process rights or trial. Trump did not differentiate between those entering to seek asylum and illegal immigrants. Lawmakers now struggle to reach consensus on immigration legislation and federal agencies are trying to reunite the migrant children with their parents. These children are now spread out throughout the country, both in foster homes and institutional settings.

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Kim Jung-un and Trump Deal: Missed Opportunity

The two leaders met on Tuesday in Singapore to sign a "comprehensive" deal. The agreement features several key details which critics argue, are vague and possibly problematic. The first point of the deal is the guarantee of "peace and prosperity" for both the United States and North Korea. The second point highlights US support for ensuring a "lasting and stable peace regime on the Korean peninsula." The deal also mentions an important point: the complete denuclearization of North Korea.  However, the leaders did not mention anything on improving human rights practices.

Joint Submission to CEDAW Committee on the State of Palestine 

Human Rights Watch,Women's Center for Legal Aid and Counseling, andEquality Now have submitted the first review on Palestine's compliance with CEDAW obligations. The report is based on findings and publications from Human Rights Watch and Women's Center for Legal Aid and Counseling as well as first-hand interviews with affected women. The report highlights the need to consider the obstacles posed by the Israeli occupation. It also explores several key issues such as honor killings of women and child marriages. 

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Monsoon Rains Hit Rohingya Refugee Camps

Monsoon rains have hit the camps housing hundreds of thousands Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh. So far, these rains have caused the death of one child and have destroyed hundreds of makeshift shelters. The UN refugee agency UNHCR reported that “large areas of the camp were underwater”, leading to 21 landslides. The rains will potentially impact upwards of 200,000 Rohingya refugees who are huddled in camps along Bangladesh’s eastern border. The monsoon season usually lasts until October.

No Mention of Reproductive Rights at G7 Development Meeting

The G7 Development Ministers’ Meetings in Whistler, Canada failed to mention reproductive rights in their concluding declarations. This occurred despite the fact the focus of the event is “the empowerment of women and girls.” Although stronger language was used at the ministerial held last week, with ministers calling for access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services, softer language was used at the declarations due to the U.S. delegation being present. This censorship is also due to Trump’s reestablishment of the Global Gag Rule.

Weekly News Roundup

By Julia d'Amours

On Thursday, US Education Secretary Betsy DeVos claimed the Department of Education would reform how universities handle accusations of sexual assault. Though DeVos did not say what specific changes would be made, she remarked that universities are “ill-served by a quasi-judicial process.” DeVos’s statement focused on the rights of the accused, whom she claimed are mistreated under current systems. Critics from the Right claim DeVos’s proposal grants disproportionate weight to the testimonies of victims, while voices from the Left say it undermines essential changes made during the Obama Administration. 

On Sunday, federal prosecutors in Brazil opened an investigation of ten murdered indigenous tribe members. The altercation arose when the members of the previously uncontacted tribe encountered Brazilian gold miners along a river near the Colombian border. This is the second reported killing of uncontacted indigenous peoples this year. Survival International, an indigenous rights organization, claimed that given the diminished populations of uncontacted tribes, a single armed conflict could carry serious repercussions for the survival of the ethnic group.

On Monday, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced that California will file a law suit against the Trump Administration over the repeal of DACA. This comes after a coalition of 15 states announced joint legal action against the proposed repeal. California is estimated to be home to more than one in every four DACA recipients. 

On Tuesday, the New York Times reported on the bleak living conditions of the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya living in Pakistan. Residents of the Rohingya-populated Arkanabad slum report police brutality, malnutrition, and lack of work and education opportunities. Rohingya in Pakistan wish to see the country taking a more firm stance against military persecution in Burma, as it holds the highest concentration of Rohingya outside of their native lands. 

On Wednesday, it was announced that Burma’s defacto leader Aung San Suu Kyi will be skipping the UN General Debate, which is scheduled to begin on September 19th. Burma has been under heavy criticism for its treatment of the Rohingya, and the UN has accused it of ethnic cleansing. Spokespeople for Ms. Suu Kyi claimed that she “has more pressing matters to deal with” and she will “speak for national reconciliation and peace” on national television instead.

Photo by Htoo Tay Zar

GJC Weekly News Roundup

By Julia d'Amours

Chile proceeds with the repeal of its total anti-abortion laws. In August, legislation was presented to permit abortion in three cases: if the life of the mother was in danger, if it the fetus would not survive, or if the pregnancy was a result of rape. Lawyers argued that a total abortion ban was inhumane and a violation of women’s rights. Though polls indicate more than 70 percent of the population supports more lenient abortion laws, the Catholic Church and elite upper class staunchly opposed the bill. The repeal is considered a major victory in women’s rights and reproductive rights, and many hope it will lead to similar legislation in the region.

Last Friday, Kenya’s Supreme Court ruled that the re-election of the sitting president would be revisited after discovery that the vote counts had been irregular. It is the first example in Africa in which a court voided the re-election of an incumbent. Many are at unease considering Kenya’s fragile political landscape—the last disputed election in 2007 resulted in at least 1,300 dead and 600,000 displaced around the country.

On Sunday, Cambodia arrested Kem Sokha, the main opposition leader, accusing him of treason. This follows accounts of government harassment on the free press and expulsion of NGOs, such as the pro-democracy National Democratic Institute. A Human Rights Watch official called the arrest “a disastrous setback” for Cambodia as the country prepares for elections next year.

On Monday, Malala Yousafzi joined an increasing number of human rights activists in publicly criticizing Myanmar’s effective leader Aung San Suu Kyi for the treatment of the Rohingya Muslim minority in Burma. More than 73,000 Rohingya have fled into Bangladesh after they were attacked by Burmese military factions on August 25th. The UN special rapporteur for human rights in Myanmar has described the situation as “grave.” Widely seen as a champion of democracy, Suu Kyi has remained quiet on the subject of the Rohingya.

On Tuesday, President Trump broke headlines by announcing the end of DACA—the federal program that protected nearly 800,000 young undocumented immigrants who were brought to the US as children. He claimed DACA’s establishment was an abuse of electoral power and rebuking it would establish rule of law. Many of those enrolled in DACA already have families, started careers, or enrolled in higher education in the US. Permits that are set to expire in the next six months will be renewed, but the Department of Homeland Security will stop processing new applications for the program. Officials say there will be no formal guidance that former DACA recipients are not eligible for deportation.

On Wednesday, the Trump Administration introduced a Security Council resolution that would empower the United States Navy and Airforce to interdict North Korean ships and evaluate if their cargo contains military equipment. It also included a ban on the shipment of crude oil, petroleum, and natural gas, which would have severe results for the North Korean population as winter approaches, and aims to block the assets of Kim Jong-un. The resolution is careful not to encompass a total blockade, which is an act of war, but permits the US and UNSC to “nonconsensual inspections.”

On Thursday, a federal appeals court permitted thousands of refugees who had been blocked by President Trumps’ travel ban to enter the country. Since June, the government has frozen refugee resettlement applications and brought resettlement programs to a standstill.  Yesterday’s ruling mandated that the government resume refugee resettlements in the next five days. It also upheld a lower court decision that exempted grandparents and other relatives from the ban. A Justice Department representative remarked that they will appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

Also on Thursday, the High Court of Australia ruled that a postal survey on the legalization of gay marriage was legitimate, despite the objections of same-sex marriage advocates. The results of the survey could not make same-sex marriage legal or illegal, but it could spark a vote in Parliament. Polls suggest that a “yes” vote in favor of legalizing gay marriage will prevail. The results will be announced the 15th of November.

Photo by Alsidare Hickson 

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Sunday, Burma rejected claims allegations of ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity against Rohingya Muslims. Last year, in response to Rohingya militants killing nine border guards, the Burmese army allegedly burned down homes, raped village women and shot people on sight in an attack that caused approximately 75,000 to flee to Bangladesh. This prompted a United Nations probe, which is being blocked by Burma.

Monday, a United Nations aid chief warned that there are the early warning signs of genocide in the Central African Republic (CAR). CAR has hosted a war between Muslim and Christian armed groups since 2013, and over half a million people have been displaced. The violence has intensified recently after a period of relative calm, and the UN warns that the risk of ethnic cleansing is heightened.

Monday, New York has formed a New York State Council on Women and Girls. The Council aims to combat discrimination against women and girls by creating state laws on issues like protecting reproductive rights and pushing for equal pay. It was formed in response to the election of President Donald Trump, who is threatening to remove the White House Council on Women and Girls.

Monday, frustrated with the United Nations’ lack of action on holding war criminals accountable, a top former war crimes prosecutor quit the UN’s Independent Commission of Inquiry on Syria. “I give up. The states in the Security Council don’t want justice,” Carla Del Ponte said. This leaves two members of the Commission. Wednesday, the New York Times published an editorial about her resignation and the Commission’s inaction.

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Thursday, the Pakistani police arrested 25 people in relation to an honor raping of a teenage girl. The unofficial council of a rural village ordered a man to publicly rape a 16-year-old girl as revenge for the girl’s brother supposedly raping the man’s 12-year-old sister. The village council, who ruled that the vengeance rape was an appropriate punishment, was arrested. Such councils are a now illegal but still widely used part of the panchayat system, an informal village governance system that often prescribes stonings, forced marriages and other punishments in disputes related to women. Authorities acted on this crime after it was reported to the new Violence Against Women Center.

Thursday, The Guardian published a timeline of landmark moments in the fight for women’s reproductive rights and health.

Sunday, in recent weeks, a social media campaign has been calling for a change to the silencing of Afghan women’s names. It is taboo for men to mention the names of their wives or female relatives in public—in fact, women’s names are rarely used in the public sphere at all (even in a doctor’s prescription). The #WhereIsMyName campaign is sparking discussion about women’s lack of public identities in Afghanistan.

Monday, Tunisia passed a law outlawing violence against women. The law will make it easier to prosecute sexual harassment and domestic abuse. The law is broad, also outlawing economic discrimination and psychological abuse, which proponents say will help prevent, in addition to punish, violence against women. While Tunisia’s marry-your-rapist laws have largely fallen out of use, this legislation also officially abolished them. Jordan also repealed its marry-your-rapist law on Wednesday.

Tuesday, to learn about the broad impact of the Global Gag Rule, read the stories of several women who were traumatized by war and will be further harmed by the Global Gag Rule. While intended to cut U.S. funding for aid organizations that perform or talk about abortion, organizations—many of which primarily offer services unrelated to abortion—are forced to reduce services or shut down. This is impacting the safety, health, psychological wellbeing and more of women across the world. Last week’s International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science expressed concerns that the Global Gag Rule, along with President Donald Trump’s proposed 20% cuts to HIV programs, could result in 90,000 additional AIDS-related deaths next year.

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Thursday, abortion rights groups—including the Center for Reproductive Rights and Planned Parenthood— filed a lawsuit against Texas over new abortion restrictions. Six weeks ago, Texas passed Senate Bill 8, which bans the most common and safe type of second-trimester abortion. It also requires healthcare providers to bury or cremate fetal remains, whether they’re from abortions, stillbirth or miscarriages. The lawsuit seeks an injunction and a ruling that the law is unconstitutional. Seven other states have created similar bans, and legal challenges have been filed against the bans in three. This is the third time this year that Texas has defended its abortion restrictions in federal court.

Friday, The New York Times reported on how nondisparagement agreements hide sexual harassment in the workplace by creating a culture of secrecy. They are becoming increasingly common and are often included in the standard employment contracts of many industries, especially the tech industry. They can have a chilling effect that prevents women from speaking up or taking legal action on harassment. Harassers are able to continue their behavior, and women are unable to know the history of their workplaces and colleagues.

Saturday, across the Middle East, public awareness campaigns are pushing to repeal marry-your-rapist laws—laws that allow rapists to avoid criminal prosecution by marrying their victims. The laws are based on ideas that a family’s honor depends on a woman’s chastity, and marriage after a rape can avoid scandal for the family. Activism and women’s education have propelled the movement against the laws. Morocco repealed their law in 2014, and votes are coming in Lebanon and Jordan.

Tuesday, the Guardian published an extended feature piece on Yazidi women. It shares the stories of women who were there when ISIS carried out a mass abduction of women that led to institutionalized rape. It also focuses on the way the Yazidi women are continuing a long history of resistance. “It was only much later in my reporting on how some Yazidi women managed to escape and return,” Cathy Otten writes, “that I became aware of how important stories of captivity and resistance were to dealing with trauma, both historically and in relation to Isis.”

Tuesday, Gillian Triggs, outgoing President of the Australian Human Rights Commission, said that human rights in Australia are “regressing on almost every front” and the government is “ideologically opposed to human rights.” She attributed the worsening human rights treatment to Australia’s lack of a bill of rights, causing the courts to be “very, very hamstrung in standing up for human rights.” She also said that counterterrorism legislation is centralizing government power and impeding on human rights without judicial supervision. 

Thursday, over 180 Yazidi women and children captured by ISIS have been liberated since the operation to recapture Mosul began last year. As time goes on, they are coming home with increasing psychological and physical damage. Most women are in shock and sleep for days after their return. Many women are also showing “an unusual degree of indoctrination.”

Photo credit: Australia Human Rights Commission Flickr (CC-BY-2.0)

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Thursday, the UK government released its “Repeal Bill”—the Brexit legislation that converts EU law into domestic law—and it’s missing the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights. Inclusion of the Charter was one of the Labour Party’s six requirements for support of the bill. The Charter guarantees a number of economic and social rights such as healthcare and the protection of personal data. Excluding the Charter could limit the ability to appeal bills that threaten those rights in court.

Monday, The Guardian showed “Why Donald Trump is bad for the health of the world – in five charts.” Most of these charts tie back to the Global Gag Rule, which will raise the abortion rate in sub-Saharan Africa, help triple Uganda’s population in 30 years by decreasing access to contraception, hurt funding to more than 60 countries and increase the number of unsafe abortions and maternal deaths. Trump’s 2018 budget also makes deeper cuts to global healthcare funding than ever before.

Wednesday, the United States eliminated its war crimes bureau, the Office of Global Criminal Justice. In Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s restructuring of the State Department, he is downgrading the office to a section of the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor. The demotion will make it more difficult to shed light on war crimes and prosecute war criminals. Three former U.S. Ambassadors-at-Large for War Crimes Issues condemned the decision in an op-ed, writing, “In effectively closing this office and eliminating the ambassadorial position, this administration removes the most potent diplomatic weapon in its arsenal and sends an unequivocal signal these are no longer priorities for the United States.”

Wednesday, Chile’s senate passed a bill legalizing abortion in some cases: when the pregnancy is a result of rape, when the fetus is unviable and when the mother’s life is at risk. Abortion had previously been illegal under all circumstances. The senate narrowly approved the bill, and it now proceeds to the house. President Michelle Bachelet, former Executive Director of UN Women, campaigned on changing the strict abortion law when she was re-elected in 2014.

Photo credit: UK Department for International Development Flickr(CC-BY-SA-2.0)

GJC Weekly News Roundup

 Wednesday, Turkey detained eleven human rights defenders near Istanbul. The activists were attending a workshop on protecting the work of human rights groups when Turkish police arrested them on the baseless suspicion of belonging to an “armed terrorist organization,” and they are still in custody. Two are leaders of Amnesty International Turkey.

Friday, the Financial Times explored Brexit’s impact on women. The British government drew attention last month because of the lack of women on their negotiating team (two of the twelve negotiators at the initial meeting were women), but concerns extend beyond that. Laws on women’s rights might change with Brexit, particularly if Britain is no longer under the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. This could remove decades of progressive decisions on issues including equal pay, pregnancy discrimination, and sex discrimination laws.

Saturday, in an article about the Afghan province Ghor, The New York Times described what happens when the law provides no protection for women. Ghor’s weak rule of law and their marriage customs leave women vulnerable. There have been 118 registered cases of violence against women in the past year—with many more going unreported—and zero suspects in these 118 cases have been arrested. Extreme stories of women being abducted, shot, stoned to death and more have emerged from the province in recent years. Law officials say they have to balance justice with security when sharing borders with violent, Taliban-occupied territories.

Monday, Oregon’s legislature passed one of the most progressive pieces of reproductive rights legislation in the country. The Reproductive Health Equity Act requires health insurance to cover, at no cost to patients, a number of reproductive health services such as abortion, contraception and prenatal and postnatal care. Religious employers can opt out of covering abortion and contraception. It also reaffirms Oregon citizens’ rights to an abortion, protecting them from possible changes in federal law. The bill will now go to Governor Kate Brown, a Democrat who is supportive of reproductive rights.

Tuesday, in retaliation against the United States’ Global Gag Rule, Sweden’s development agency announced it will no longer give funding for sexual and reproductive health services to organizations that follow the Gag Rule. Sweden is also allocating new funds to organizations that agree to not follow the Gag Rule.

Wednesday, Buddhists protested the arrival of a UN human rights envoy to Myanmar. The envoy is on an information-gathering trip in the Rakhine state to investigate security forces’ human rights abuses against the Muslim Rohingya minority. The protestors said Yanghee Lee, who is leading the envoy, is too “one-sided.” Earlier this summer, Lee recommended a special UN mission to investigate the problems in Rakhine, which the Human Rights Council approved; however, Myanmar wouldn’t allow the mission members to enter the country.

Wednesday, U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is re-examining the college sexual assault policies instituted under Title IX during the Obama administration. She is meeting with victims of sexual assault, men accused of assault, and higher education officials. Obama’s policies sparked a backlash from some who believed the policies and investigations went too far in ignoring the rights of the accused.

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Thursday, an appeals court ruled that abortion law in Northern Ireland should be determined by a legislature, not by courts or local government. It ruled against a change in law to allow abortions in cases of rape or fatal fetal abnormality. Abortion restrictions are stricter in Northern Ireland than they are in the rest of the United Kingdom; it is legal only if there is a serious risk to the mother’s health or life. Abortion rights advocates are hoping the case will proceed to the Supreme Court. The same day, the UK government passed legislation allowing women in Northern Ireland to have abortions for free in England under the National Health Service.

Thursday, the state prosecutor’s office charged Antonio Benavides, the former head of Venezuela’s National Guard, with human rights violations. He was removed from his post last week and reassigned to a position as head of Venezuela’s Capital District government after a video of his troops shooting handguns at protestors was released. The office also said they had evidence that his forces used “excessive force” against demonstrators, tortured protestors, issued raids without warrants, and more. Anti-government protests have swelled in recent months, pushing for the resignation of President Nicolas Maduro and demanding general elections.

Monday, the New York Times reported that while the Trump administration has not followed through on policies that help women and families, states have. Experts say that states have been increasingly active on these policies, which have widespread support, because of the slow pace of policymaking in Congress. Recent state legislation includes paid family leave and breast-feeding breaks and lactation rooms in the workplace.

Wednesday, aid groups protested Australia’s decrease in foreign aid spending on family planning and urged the government to compensate for the family planning aid void left by the Trump administration’s Global Gag Rule. Their recently released overseas development assistance budget shows that aid funding for family planning went from AU$46.4m in 2013-2014 to $23.7m in 2015-2016.

Photo credit: Diliff (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Friday, Missouri is moving toward passing a bill that would allow landlords and employers to discriminate against women who have had abortions or use contraception. The House passed an expanded version of the bill, known as SB 5, which the Senate first passed on June 14 during a special session called by Governor Eric Greitens. The session was intended to overturn an ordinance that prevents employers and landlords from discriminating against women because of their reproductive health choices. While the Federal Pregnancy Discrimination Act prohibits discrimination against women who have had an abortion, it makes no mention of discrimination based on birth control.

Thursday, the United States rejected a United Nations resolution against gender-based violence because of a paragraph calling for access to reproductive health services, including abortion where it is legal. U.S. official Jason Mack said that while the United States agrees with the “spirit” of the resolution, it cannot endorse the paragraph on reproductive services because t the U.S. does “not recognize abortion as a method of family planning, nor do we support abortion in our reproductive health assistance.”

Monday, the Polish government passed legislation restricting access to emergency contraception. The president signed a bill that classifies the “morning-after pill” as a prescription drug, meaning that women will now have to make a doctor’s appointment to obtain it. Polish doctors are allowed to refuse treatment based on religious grounds. 

Monday, Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, delivered a speech criticizing Western countries for undermining human rights, arguing that “the dangers to the entire system of international law are therefore very real.” He warned that U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s threat to abandon human rights if they hinder terrorism investigations would encourage authoritarian regimes.  He also condemned the Trump administration’s travel ban and “flirtation” with torture.

Photo credit: Yassie CC-BY-SA-3.0

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Monday was the International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict. This year’s theme was “Preventing Sexual Violence Crimes through Justice and Deterrence.” The UN held a panel discussion at Headquarters in New York, and Secretary-General António Guterres issued a statement, writing, “Rape and sexual violence in conflict are tactics of terrorism and war, used strategically to humiliate, degrade and destroy, and often to pursue a campaign of ethnic cleansing.”

Monday, Human Rights Watch submitted a report to the Canadian government on police abuse of Indigenous women in Saskatchewan. Their investigation found patterns of physical assault, sexual harassment, neglect of domestic violence reports, and inappropriate body and strip searches.

Monday, France elected a record number of women to Parliament. Of the 577 newly elected representatives, 223 are women (compared to 155 elected in the last election). This brings France from 64th to 17th in the world rankings of women in parliaments. The increase is due to President Emmanuel Macron's Republic on the Move (LREM) party prioritizing women on their candidate list.

Tuesday, the Washington Post reported that while the lack of Republican women in Congress is often attributed to the Democratic Party’s focus on women’s rights and a stronger political pipeline for Democratic women, it could also be influenced by money. In the Democratic Party, unlike in the Republican Party, female donors give disproportionately to female candidates. This allows female Democratic candidates to raise as much money as their male counterparts, which is not true for female Republican candidates. Only 26 of the 104 women in Congress are Republican.

Tuesday, New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman filed a lawsuit against anti-abortion protestors who stand outside of Choices Women’s Medical Center in Queens. The suit seeks to prohibit protestors blocking entrance into the clinic, threatening patients, or protesting within 16 feet of the clinic.

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Friday, the New York Times published an editorial about the United States' mixed messages on human rights. While U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley emphasized U.S. commitment to human rights in her address last week, the editorial board writes, “In President Donald Trump’s transactional worldview, human rights are annoying obstacles to making deals.”

Friday, Devex reported that Sweden’s state secretary for international development, Ulrika Modéer, said that Nordic countries cannot fill the gap created by the U.S. Global Gag Rule alone. She said the European Union must take more action on family planning, and non-European countries need to join alliances for reproductive rights.

Monday, Canada released an International Assistance Policy that heavily focuses on gender equality. Within five years, Canada will allocate 15% of its international aid to gender equality programs. Its Women’s Voice and Leadership Program will direct funding to international grassroots organizations that promote women’s rights and gender equality.

Monday, Politico published an investigation into the gender imbalance in U.S. politics. It found that barriers like media and voter sexism, party influence, and fundraising have lessened in importance. Now, the gap stems mostly from the lack of women who run for office. Interest has spiked since the presidential election, however. Politico suggests a few strategies for encouraging this interest: identifying female candidates earlier, pushing women elected to bodies like school boards to run for higher office, and changing the sales pitch used to recruit women by framing politics as a way to fix problems.

Tuesday, the United Nations ruled Ireland’s abortion ban to be a human rights violation. In 2010, an Irish woman traveled to the U.K. to terminate her pregnancy when she learned that the fetus had a fatal birth defect. The United Nations Human Rights Committee released a decision ruling that Ireland owes her damages for the cost of the abortion and “high level of mental anguish.” The UN made a similar ruling on Ireland’s laws last year.

Photo credit: Dmitry Dzhus Flickr CC-BY-2.0

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Sunday, Executive Director of the U.N. Population Fund Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin died. He worked to ensure access to family planning for all. “Family planning is not a privilege but a right. Yet, too many women — and men — are denied this human right,” Osotimehin said.

Tuesday, Devex reported on how the Global Gag Rule has affected conflict-affected populations. In Colombia, a non-profit called Profamilia has provided reproductive health services and education like workshops on gender-based violence to vulnerable towns since 1964. In January, it chose not to comply with the expanded Global Gag Rule, and it lost $1.2 million of USAID funding, $1.5 million for a maternal mortality program, and $300,000 for a Zika prevention program.

Tuesday, authorities in Saudi Arabia detained prominent women’s rights activist Loujain al-Hathloul. While the exact reason for her arrest is unknown, Amnesty International believes it relates to her women’s rights activism. In 2014, she was arrested and held for 73 days for trying to drive a car from the United Arab Emirates to Saudi Arabia.

Tuesday, the Trump administration suggested the possibility of a U.S. exit from the United Nations Human Rights Council. In her first address to the UNHRC and in an op-ed in The Washington Post, U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley argued that the council exhibits anti-Israel bias and ignores the human rights violations of its members.

Wednesday, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May said the country needs to be more aggressive in combatting terrorism, “and if our human rights laws get in the way of doing it, we will change the law so we can do it.” May proposed making it easier to deport foreign terrorist suspects and to “restrict the freedom and movements of terrorist suspects” against whom there is not enough evidence to prosecute in court.

Wednesday, The New Yorker explained how the Global Gag Rule affects Africa by targeting women in some of the world’s poorest countries. The United States provides more international health assistance than any other country, and in these regions, there are too few health centers to provide specific services like abortion. The Gag Rule also complicates treatment of women with H.I.V. and AIDS because providers cannot even raise the question of abortion to a woman who’s infected, which will result in more infected children and less money to treat them with.

Photo Credit: U.K. Department for International Development Flickr CC-BY-2.0

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Monday, women gathered outside of the capitol in Hartford, Connecticut as the marches and protests against the Trump administration continued. Women came promoting women’s rights and addressed lawmakers that they were unhappy with the lack of equal rights.

Tuesday, reproductive rights activists protested the new vote to defund Planned Parenthood nationwide. Many protesters and Planned Parenthood supporters site the importance of the organization, which offers not only abortions, but also mammograms, pap smears and contraceptives, all of which are essential to women’s reproductive health.

Tuesday, an interesting article was posted on the importance of essential maternity care and the need for insurance companies to provide women with post-natal medical coverage. It criticizes the new healthcare plan that Republicans are pushing for, as it allows state governments to “waive such essential coverage” which “threatens the small but significant gains made for vulnerable women in the years since Obamacare became law.”

GJC Weekly News Roundup

Thursday, here’s a good list of the main provision of the new Republican Health Care Bill. Some of the changes include allowing insurers to charge older adults more than younger adults for the same coverage and Medicaid cuts amounting to $880 billion over the next 10 years. 

Thursday, the Global Gag Rule is negatively affecting women in India where abortion is considered a woman’s right. The Gag Rule could negatively impact India’s sovereignty and put women in danger if access to healthcare is limited. People are arguing that abortion cannot be separated from women’s healthcare, as it should come together as one package in order to protect women.

Thursday, Hillary Clinton speaks out against the “troubling ideas” regarding women and healthcare that have been spreading because of the current administration and President Trump. In her speech, she mentioned that women’s issues should not be considered minor and criticized the efforts to repeal ACA.

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