Gender and Genocide

GJC’s new project focuses on the gendered components of genocide, specifically addressing non-killing genocidal acts which disproportionately affect women. In addition to mass killings, the 1948 Genocide Convention laid out four other types of genocidal actions that can be used to systematically destroy a religious or ethnic group: inflicting bodily or mental harm including rape and torture; denying access to basic necessities such as food and water; preventing births including through sterilization and forced abortion; and kidnapping and detaining children.

In the case of ISIS’s genocide of the Yazidi, we know that they are committing these crimes around sharply divided gender lines: killing older men & women and abducting young women and girls and enslaving them.

GJC is fighting for the international community, including the UN, EU and all 147 states that signed the Genocide Convention to recognize that genocide is happening, take immediate steps to prevent further genocide and suppress ongoing genocide, including fulfilling their duty to rescue women and girls who are being held captive, and to punish genocide by supporting prosecutions at the International Criminal Court.


Criminal Accountability for Heinous Crimes in Burma: A Joint Project of the Global Justice Center and the Burma’s Lawyer’s Council

The Global Justice Center and the Burma Lawyers' Council publish, in a joint project, this fact sheet on criminal accountability for heinous crimes in Burma.

This fact sheet gives information on the project on criminal accountability, and states that the Security Council should end the impunity accorded the Burmese military junta for crimes perpetrated against the people of Burma, as well as establish an Independent Commission of Inquiry. The fact sheet also explains the Security Council's Obligation to Act under Chapter VII.

 

Download PDF

Iraqi Women's Rights and International Law

The Women’s Alliance for a Democratic Iraq (WAFDI) and the Global Justice Center (GJC) jointly organized a three-day conference on women’s rights and international law November 13th – 15th at the Dead Sea, Jordan.  Attendees included twenty members of the Iraqi High Tribunal (IHT) and representatives from the President’s office, the Prime Minister’s office, the Parliament, the Ministry of Human Rights as well as prominent members of civil society.  The conference addressed a crucial subject for women in Iraq: sexual violence, as a war crime, a crime against humanity and an instrument of genocide, and its drastic impact on the victims.  This issue was addressed in the context of international law and its role in the IHT, with an eye towards having the IHT address these crimes in its upcoming indictments and judgments.

Download PDF